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Last Seven Days

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Correct. See the millions, billions entry for guidance.

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Part of that guidance that's not spelled out is: What are some uses that might lead to confusion? We often avoid putting capitalized words together in usages such as Firefighters Monday rescued ... or Firefighters Oct. 14 rescued ... because it almost looks like there's a thing called Firefighters Monday. That's different from a sentence such as He is going home Tuesday.  In that sentence, the on definitely isn't needed. 

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No, it's not the same rule. In most cases,  either all or all of is correct. 

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Yes, that's just fine.

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Often a hyphen works just fine: The event is Oct. 21-22. But days of the week look a little off in that format. How about: The event is Saturday and Sunday.

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I'd go with This is her bread and butter.

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Either is fine.

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Version 1 is good.

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It's not just a local preference. We have this entry:
Sierra Nevada, the  Not Sierra Nevada mountains or Sierra Nevada mountain range. (Sierra means mountain range.)

Usually we use the full name in all references. But if the context is clear, the Sierra or the northern Sierra or such is fine on second reference.


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Thanks for noting this. We are using fire line. We'll get the backfire entry fixed to conform.

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Waiting for is more commonly used. 

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Lowercase, since it's not a proper name.

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No, just as newspaper or magazine names aren't italicized or put in quote marks. 

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We use Energy Star as the style in all cases. 

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Putting the date in that part of the sentence creates a number of problems. You're better off to rephrase. For instance:
On Oct. 14, firefighters rescued four climbers who had been stranded on Mount Rainier for three days.
Firefighters on Oct. 14 rescued four climbers who had been stranded on Mount Rainier for three days.

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Lowercase endowed dean in that usage, just as you'd lowercase the president of the United States or the governor of Maryland.

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How about: Creating the group requires one or more organizations to step up.
 

Question from Austin, TX on Oct 19, 2017

I believe you incorrectly answered this question:

QUESTION from lakeland, Fla. on Sep 01, 2015
ANSWER On first reference, The New York Times. On second reference, the Times is acceptable: The event will feature author John Smith, whose books were twice on The New York Times best-seller list. John Smith, whose book was No. 1 on The New York Times best-seller list, will be featured. The author has written 15 books, all listed as best-sellers by the Times.

This is less a question about first and second reference than it is about whether to use the "The" when there is an adjective right before the name. Recasting may be optimal, but it's not always an option and you have to run "a two-time New York Times best-selling author" where "New York Times is acting as an adjective; "a two-time The New York Times best-selling author" would sound terrible. Also, in the example you give, the "The" instances in bold above are not part of the name. "New York Times" is acting as the adjective and "the" is an article required as part of the sentence. It's like saying "I watched the Sopranos television show" and "I watched The Sopranos." Both are correct. The article is not acting as part of the name in the first instance. It should be able to stand alone without the adjective: "whose books were twice on the best-seller list." Anyway, this question as posed by the user comes up a lot and I think you should change your answer to reflect the actual question.

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You are correct. Thanks very much for pointing this out. We will correct the previous answer.

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That's an excellent idea about the countable/noncountable issue. Your theory seems on target. Dessert can be a noncountable noun, so go with the singular. Also, note that our style would call for three to be written as a word, not a numeral, in this usage. 

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There isn't a difference. We'll delete the answer referring to non-cigarette. Thanks for pointing it out.

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We've discovered that the guidance on this point is a bit contradictory, and we'll be addressing that in the coming months. For now, either is OK!

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 Both, although we'd most likely use the latter, since the focus probably would be on his life in the United States after he immigrated.

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Use 1.5 inch. The Stylebook says, "Use figures for precise amounts larger than 1, converting to decimals whenever practical."

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The punctuation in both cases is correct. But typically the phrasing is 16-square-foot extension, not 16-foot-square.

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The AP does not place quotes around ransomware names. To quote the Stylebook: "If punctuation does not help make clear what is being said, it should not be there." 

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