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Last Seven Days

Answer

We don't have an opinion, per se. The term is recognized by our official dictionary, Webster's New World College Dictionary:

quasi-judicial  adj. having to do with powers that are to some extent judicial, as those of certain federal or state boards and commissions


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Using the Stylebook's general guidance, it would be semitruck:

semi-   The rules in prefixes apply, but in general, no hyphen. Some examples: semifinal semiofficial semi-invalid semitropical But semi-automatic, semi-autonomous.

 

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No hyphen. We'll fix the Breathalyzer entry. Thanks.

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We'd recommend spelling it out.

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 A general description rather than the full name is preferred on first reference: Leading industrial nations. Then in later references, Group of Seven and G-7 after that.

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In the category of sometimes rules just need to be broken, I'd put the comma outside the quote mark, as you have it. The alternative is a numeral followed by three pieces of punctuation, which is craziness made even worse by the all-caps word preceding it.

Better yet, rephrase it if possible: With the  “INTO 3!” concept, we make three dishes each class.


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Yes, that's hyphenated.


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AP style calls for numerals in headlines, and I'd classify the header of a listicle as a type of headline. So you're fine!

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Yes, the comma placement is correct. You also could use a colon after said, like this:

Meredith Hill, CEO of Global Institute for Travel Entrepreneurs, said: “If you’re speaking to everyone, you speak to no one.”

Or, depending on whether this approach would work with the rest of the piece, you might consider something like this:

“If you’re speaking to everyone, you speak to no one.” That's the philosophy (or advice, wisdom, etc.) offered by Meredith Hill, CEO of Global Institute for Travel Entrepreneurs.


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Without the hyphens is clear, so do without.


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Yes, it's best to hyphenate that.


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If it's more than one, we lowercase it: hurricanes Katrina and Rita.



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The way you have it is fine. Of course, you should include a few words of explanation for those not familiar with these monuments.


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No quote marks, and no capital letters except for the name of the company.


Question from Irvine, CA on July 11, 2018

is "unbased," as in an unbased claim, proper language?

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Some dictionaries recognize it, but it's rarely used.

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Sorry, no definitive answer! This is one that could go either way. My preference would be for the first option, considering date and time as one concept for the purpose of scheduling.



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First, a question: Might a reader reasonably be able to distinguish Julie Baker Smith from her parents, college-aged daughter, 10-year-old son and brother, especially if those other people are listed from left to right in order of appearance? That is, would it be clear to write: Julie Baker Smith ’91, celebrates her induction to the Athletics Hall of Fame with her parents Rick and Grace Baker, daughter Nicole Smith ’22, son Jake Smith, 10, and brother Pat Baker.

Maybe so, maybe not. If there's a chance for confusion, we'd write: Julie Baker Smith '91, third from left, celebrates ...


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Yes, your belief is correct. Those (annoying!) capital letters are necessary to avoid confusion, which would be an even greater annoyance.


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I stand corrected. Thank you for pointing it out. 

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No need to hyphenate that noun phrase.

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Either is fine. The first may be technically better. But I find the second easier to read and comprehend, and there's no mistaking what the meaning is.

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We'd recommend these:

The university provides on-campus housing to all students. 
We have bicycles available on campus. 
On-campus parking is limited.


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I'd call it an occupational description, and thus not capitalized.

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It's two words in AP usage.


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When people own ...

The word people is always plural. It can't refer to a single person.


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