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Answer

You might point out to the CEO what AP style is. Then if the CEO still prefers the more-capitalization approach, I'd say you're best off to go with that preferred approach (as long as it's not weirdly Capitalized). It's common for companies to have a house style that differs from AP style in some regards. Just be sure to stay consistent with your own style once you've established it.






Answer

That's correct.


Answer

Yes, it's best to hyphenate that for clarity.


Answer

You definitely need the hyphen. I prefer the second option.


Question from Washington, DC on Nov. 16, 2018

I'm following up on a question I submitted about pull quotes (pasted below). You answered that doing a text paraphrase without quotation marks would be an option. But I thought if we used the author's own words and not a quotation from a source in the story, a pull quote wouldn't have quotation marks. So when using the author's words as a pull quote (which wouldn't have quotation marks), is it acceptable to paraphrase? Thanks for your help!
Original question:
When using narrative text rather than a quotation from a source as a pull quote, what type of changes are acceptable? For example, could we replace a vague "it" with the specific noun even if "it" was used in the body text?
from Washington, DC on Nov. 15, 2018 

See our guidance for quoting written words, which includes texts:

When quoting written words, retain the style used by the writer; do not alter the written words even if they don't match AP style.
Use quotations only if they are the best way to tell the story or convey meaning. Often, paraphrasing is preferable.

In your situation, we say don't change it to a specific word if the original text used it. You might consider doing a text paraphrase, without quote marks.

Answer

AP doesn't have a style for pull quotes; you would set your own for that. In general, if it's an actual quotation, we would always use quote marks. And in any kind of a quotation, we wouldn't paraphrase. You might also simply look for a pull quote option that's clear as written and doesn't present these problems!


Answer

It will be shipped in one to three business days. No need to add between and and; it's understood.

Answer

See our guidance for quoting written words, which includes texts:

When quoting written words, retain the style used by the writer; do not alter the written words even if they don't match AP style.
Use quotations only if they are the best way to tell the story or convey meaning. Often, paraphrasing is preferable.

In your situation, we say don't change it to a specific word if the original text used it. You might consider doing a text paraphrase, without quote marks.


Answer

A name from the past!

Here's the relevant section of the comma entry, with boldface added (and see my note below):

WITH CONJUNCTIONS: When a conjunction such as and, but or for links two clauses that could stand alone as separate sentences, use a comma before the conjunction in most cases: She was glad she had looked, for a man was approaching the house.
As a rule of thumb, use a comma if the subject of each clause is expressly stated: We are visiting Washington, and we also plan a side trip to Williamsburg. We visited Washington, and our senator greeted us personally. But no comma when the subject of the two clauses is the same and is not repeated in the second: We are visiting Washington and plan to see the White House.
The comma may be dropped if two clauses with expressly stated subjects are short. In general, however, favor use of a comma unless a particular literary effect is desired or if it would distort the sense of a sentence.

So, as a rule of thumb, you don't need the comma in this case. Nonetheless, I would use the comma to help the sentence rhythm and break up two fairly long clauses. As you note, it helps with clarity.


Answer

Use the park's punctuation.


Answer

I'd suggest simply not using that as your pull quote, since it's clunky any way you do it. Also, it's a boring quote, so why highlight it?

Maybe not use it as a quote, and instead paraphrase: Alzheimer's disease: hard to diagnose.


Answer

From our perspective, use is always better than utilize. It's shorter, more conversational and means the same thing. 

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No. Lowercase the word company when it stands alone.

Answer

We use "opportunity zones," lowercase with quote marks and a brief definition. On subsequent references, opportunity zones or simply zones, no quote marks. Also: The "opportunity zones" program on first reference. Assuming the first reference has already been made, you could refer to qualified opportunity zones on later references.


Answer

We don't have a style specifically. I'd think Psy.D. would be logical, following the form for our established Ph.D.

Answer

One word in that usage. Or how about simply on the UAV?



Answer

This is another case in which rules may need to be broken, and broken in a way that's not consistent with past rule-breakings. I'm sure this will cause some angst among Ask the Editor readers, and I'd happy to hear other views.

First, see this recent Q&A:

Q: Which is correct - five bedrooms and five-and-a-half bathrooms or 5 bedrooms and 5 1/2 bathrooms? 

A: Technically, in AP style, it's five bedrooms and 5 1/2 bathrooms. Obviously, that looks odd to readers who don't know AP style. Sometimes rules need to be broken for the sake of common sense. I'd use 5 bedrooms and 5 1/2 bathrooms in this case.

That might indicate that for your question, I'd recommend 1 to 1 1/2 times. And I was about to do just that. Until I looked at it again, and my eyes crossed.

There's something about all those 1's in such close proximity, coupled with the slash, that makes this particular combination very hard to read. I always try to put the readers' needs first, even if it may be counter to style or inconsistent with what we do in some other cases.

So, for your case, I'd go with .... one to one-and-a-half times the employee's annual salary ... for ease of reading. (Note the hyphens in one-and-a-half.)

If others see it differently, please weigh in.




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Some references allow its use as a verb, with a hyphen. We'd prefer to avoid it in most cases, but it could work in a very short headline such as yours.

Answer

Here's the entry, with the relevant section in boldface for emphasis in answering this question. In short: ex-French president.


ex- 


Use no hyphen for words that use ex- in the sense of out of:
excommunicate | expropriate
Hyphenate when using ex- in the sense of former:
ex-convict | ex-president
Do not capitalize ex- when attached to a formal title before a name: ex-President Richard Nixon. The prefix modifies the entire term: ex-New York Gov. Mario Cuomo; not New York ex-Gov.
Usually former is better.


Answer

Yes, our guidance holds in that case. We also wouldn't use (sic). We would ask: Is the quote truly essential, or could you simply paraphrase it in a grammatically correct way? As always, of course, you could choose to not follow our guidance in cases where you feel that's the right course of action.

Answer

Thanks for catching that. We will fix it today. Degree-day should be hyphenated in the text:  Positive values are cooling degree-days and negative values are heating degree-days.

Answer

No comma after interview, per the section of the comma entry that I've boldfaced for emphasis:

WITH CONJUNCTIONS: When a conjunction such as and, but or for links two clauses that could stand alone as separate sentences, use a comma before the conjunction in most cases: She was glad she had looked, for a man was approaching the house.
As a rule of thumb, use a comma if the subject of each clause is expressly stated: We are visiting Washington, and we also plan a side trip to Williamsburg. We visited Washington, and our senator greeted us personally. But no comma when the subject of the two clauses is the same and is not repeated in the second: We are visiting Washington and plan to see the White House.
The comma may be dropped if two clauses with expressly stated subjects are short. In general, however, favor use of a comma unless a particular literary effect is desired or if it would distort the sense of a sentence.

There should be a comma after agreement, per this section (the rights and obligations part triggers the rule):

Put a comma before the concluding conjunction in a series if an integral element of the series requires a conjunction: I had orange juice, toast, and ham and eggs for breakfast.


Answer

Not capitalized in that usage. See this entry:


happy holidays, merry Christmas, season's greetings, happy birthday, happy new year 


Lowercase except in exclamations (Christmas is always capitalized): Have a happy new year, wishing you a merry Christmas, sending season's greetings your way. In exclamations: Happy holidays! Merry Christmas! Season's greetings! Happy New Year! (New Year is uppercase in this use for the Jan. 1 holiday.) Happy birthday! See New Year's, New Year's Day, New Year's Eve, Happy New Year.


Answer

From the composition titles entry:

—Capitalize the principal words, including prepositions and conjunctions of four or more letters.
—Capitalize an article — the, a, an — or words of fewer than four letters if it is the first or last word in a title.

Both my and your should be capitalized.

Answer

We've temporarily removed the headlines entry because it needs to be updated. Ask a question and I will answer it! Sorry for the inconvenience.


Answer

Make it one word, put quote marks around it, and give a brief definition on first reference. It's OK without quote marks on subsequent references.


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Jamal Khashoggi

khahr-SHOHK’-jee

Washington Post columnist killed at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul

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2018 Midterm Elections Topical Guide

Editors: A style guide for the 2018 elections, based on the AP Stylebook and common usage in AP stories: POLITICAL TITLES, TERMINOLOGY, INSTITUTIONS AND KEY EVENTS "alt-right" A political grouping...


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