Ask the Editor

Last Seven Days

Answer

The way you have it is correct. AP wouldn't use the year if it's within the current calendar year. But if there's a chance for confusion, then do use the year.


Answer

We would spell it out. If EP on first reference makes more sense for your specific audience, then do what seems right for that audience.



Answer

The way you have it is correct.


Answer

We don't have a preference; it's not a term that we would use since it's not recognizable to many readers.


Question from Warr Acres, OK on Sept. 17, 2018

Is it Wi-Fi or WiFi?

Answer

AP style is Wi-Fi.


Answer

We defer to Webster's New World College Dictionary: will call.


Answer

AP uses just Israel, except in quotes, when we lowercase state: "It's a good day for the state of Israel," he said.

Answer

I don't think the hyphen is necessary. I think readers understand business travel as a single concept.



Answer

The AP Stylebook's official dictionary is Webster's New World College Dictionary, which shows only bull's-eye. Your link is to a different dictionary. This is one of many examples in the English language in which more than one style or spelling is acceptable; it's a matter of which style you choose to follow. If you wish to use Your Dictionary instead of Webster's New World College Dictionary for this or any word, that's certainly your option. I see from Your Dictionary's bullseye entry that it also differs from AP with spellings such as centre and cancelled.


Answer

I'm not seeing bullseye in my search of Webster's New World College Dictionary. A previous Ask the Editor  said:

Question from Huntsville, Ala. on Feb. 28, 2013  Is the noun "bull's eye" or "bullseye" or "bull's-eye"?

Answer
Deferring to Webster's bull's-eye. 


Question from Santa Rosa, CA on Sept. 15, 2018

chief of staff-elect or chief-elect of staff?

Answer

It's chief of staff-elect. Consider the term chief of staff as one word.


Answer

Do you really, really need to use that as a quote? It's pretty indecipherable and doesn't do a service to either the speaker or the reader.

Do the requests result in the download? if so, that should be which have resulted, not which has resulted. If the speaker said has, then you're stuck with an ungrammatical quote.

As for the rest of it, I'd do it this way (again, if it's absolutely essential that you use the quote):  ... that’s maybe 43,000 questions to me — `Can you find this picture for me?' — that I’ve avoided." 


Answer

Yes, that's correct.

Answer

That can be argued either way. I'd go with lines in this case.

Answer

Yes, those are correct.

Answer

Either is fine.


Answer

Yes, spell it out in all references unless your specific audience uses the shorthand IP routinely.

Answer

There are various ways, but I'd do it this way:

other regulation proposals from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26, at headquarters.


Answer

U.S. Open in text, though we use US Open in headlines.



Answer

I don't see it in our official dictionary (Webster's New World College Dictionary, Fifth Edition). However, the American Heritage Dictionary, which we also use, lists it as one word. So we would go with one word: toolkit.

Answer

Possessive in that use: one of the Hamptons' most popular events.

Answer

Either is fine.


Answer

Our guidance for headlines, such as those on news stories, calls for capitalizing only the first word and proper nouns. Guidance on composition titles is different. It's possible the two are being confused. Here is the composition titles entry:


 composition titles 


Apply the guidelines listed here to book titles, computer and video game titles, movie titles, opera titles, play titles, poem titles, album and song titles, radio and television program titles, and the titles of lectures, speeches and works of art.
The guidelines, followed by a block of examples:
—Capitalize the principal words, including prepositions and conjunctions of four or more letters.
—Capitalize an article — the, a, an — or words of fewer than four letters if it is the first or last word in a title.
—Put quotation marks around the names of all such works except the Bible, the Quran and other holy books, and books that are primarily catalogs of reference material. In addition to catalogs, this category includes almanacs, directories, dictionaries, encyclopedias, gazetteers, handbooks and similar publications. Do not use quotation marks around such software titles as WordPerfect or Windows.
—Translate a foreign title into English unless a work is generally known by its foreign name. An exception to this is reviews of musical performances. In those instances, generally refer to the work in the language it was sung in, so as to differentiate for the reader. However, musical compositions in Slavic languages are always referred to in their English translations.
EXAMPLES: "The Star-Spangled Banner," "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich," "Gone With the Wind," "Of Mice and Men," "For Whom the Bell Tolls," "Time After Time," the NBC-TV "Today" program, the "CBS Evening News," "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," "Star Wars," "Game of Thrones." See television program names for further guidelines and examples.
REFERENCE WORKS: IHS Jane's All the World's Aircraft; Encyclopaedia Britannica; Webster's New World Dictionary of the American Language, Second Edition.
Names of most websites and apps are capitalized without quotes: Facebook, Foursquare.
EXCEPTION: "FarmVille" and similar computer game apps are in quotes.
Foreign works: Rousseau's "War," not Rousseau's "La Guerre." But: Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa." Mozart's "The Marriage of Figaro" if sung in English but "Le Nozze di Figaro" if sung in Italian. Mozart's "The Magic Flute" if sung in English but "Die Zauberfloete" if sung in German. "Die Walkuere" and "Goetterdaemmerung" from Wagner's "Der Ring des Nibelungen" if sung in German but "The Valkyrie" and "The Twilight of the Gods" from "The Ring of the Nibelung" if sung in English. Janacek's "From the House of the Dead," not Janacek's "Z Mrtveho Domu."
—For other classical music titles, use quotation marks around the composition's nicknames but not compositions identified by its sequence.
EXAMPLES: Dvorak's "New World Symphony." Dvorak's Symphony No. 9.


Question from Pasadena, CA on Sept. 13, 2018

Is it Uyghurs or Uighurs? 

Answer

Uighurs.


Answer

I am (not) resisting the urge to ask the machine what it would do! I agree that machine learning can be regarded as a recognizable phrase. I'd do it this way: machine learning-based algorithm.

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