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Last Seven Days

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I think you're correct. I'm trying to think of an example in which first and only wouldn't be as redundant as you suggest. So far, I have no luck.

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His mind-numbing speech did not help his cause. His mind-numbingly dull speech did not help his cause.

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We don't have a style for wheel dimensions. 

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It can be three: the brown, skittish, hungry cat. If the adjectives can be rearranged and carry the same meaning, they can be separated by commas. Or, if they could instead be separated by and, they can be separated by commas:

The skittish, brown, hungry cat. The skittish and brown and hungry cat.

(Not that I'm thinking of any cat in particular ...)


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Did the Young Professionals Group "adopt" 20 children? If so, it's correct. That assumes that you clarify what it means for a group to "adopt" 20 children.

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It means we no longer have strong feelings about it. Our preference is pleaded. Webster's New World College Dictionary recognizes both pleaded and pled.

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I'd use the hyphens.


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You certainly can spell it out if you prefer. AP stories use St. Paul.

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We didn't previously have an entry for Tourette syndrome. So when we created one, we chose to go with the style used consistently by the CDC and NIH (though the no-possessive version differs from Webster's New World College Dictionary and Merriam Webster).

Looks to me like CDC and NIH use both versions of Parkinson/Parkinson's and Crohn/Crohn's. We're not planning to change our current style for Parkinson's, and we follow Webster's New World on Crohn's. That could be subject to discussion in the future.




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The comma is optional. I'd say because works much better than as in both examples.

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That's an OK use of parentheses; in fact, I think it works very well. Also, just making sure you know that we changed our style to % rather than percent. Not everyone is going along with it and you might be in that camp ...


Question from Washington , DC on Dec. 11, 2019

Paycard or pay card?

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Two words.

Question from Jessup, MD on Dec. 11, 2019

Is it Medicare Trust Fund or Medicare trust fund?

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We use the latter.


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The dictionaries don't seem to recognize the adjective form, though certainly it's often used as an adjective. Go with one word: carpool lanes.

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I'd make it individuals age 55 and older ...

Question from Santa Barbara, CA on Dec. 10, 2019

What tense should I use in writing AP style news articles?


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Generally we use past tense, particularly for straight news stories.


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Yes, if you're dealing with a table, 1-3 years is fine.

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Typically we'd use 9.5 million. If necessary, 9.55 million is OK. We would not write 9,550,000.


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The proper name is the Paris Agreement. Certainly the word agreement also works in a generic lowercased sense, as in the 2015 Paris agreement. If you prefer the proper name, you could call it the 2015 Paris Agreement (and then explain what the agreement is). 

Question from Anderson, SC on Dec. 10, 2019

Is healthcare "providers" considered  jargon?

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We'd prefer to be specific when possible. But often it's not. So we do use the term health care providers when necessary. Also, our style is two words: health care.

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One to three years to yield a return.

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 I think it's fine without the hyphen. Readers almost certainly recognize the term electric vehicle. And they almost certainly wouldn't read a hyphen-free version to mean a vehicle market that is electric.

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U.S. is OK on first reference, though generally we do spell it out on first reference.

We spell out European Union on first reference and use EU (no periods) thereafter.


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For AP stories, we'd use the dateline of the city where the writer is working. That may not work for your purposes. I'd probably use no location in the dateline, if there's not a place that would logically work.

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I don't know why anyone would think there's anything unacceptable there, if I'm understanding the question correctly. Do you want to write this:

CEO John Smith said he thinks the merger is positive.
"It's a great financial move," he said.
Smith went on to describe the ways he thinks the merger will benefit the companies. Then he said some more things. And he said more things after that.
"And this is a really great quote about all the things I'm saying," he said.

All of that is absolutely fine. 




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From the Pronunciation Guide

Kyiv

KEE'-yeev

Capital of Ukraine (new spelling and pronunciation)

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From the Topical Guides

2019 Holiday Style Topical Guide

Spellings and definitions of terms associated with religious and cultural events around the turn of the year. Some are in the AP Stylebook; others are common usage in holiday stories transmitted...


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