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Here's the guidance from the hyphen entry:

SUSPENSIVE HYPHENATION: Use these forms to shorten a compound modifier or a noun phrase that shares a common word:
When the elements are joined by and or or, expressing more than one element: 10-, 15- or 20-minute intervals; 5- and 6-year-olds. But: The intervals are 10, 15 or 20 minutes; the children are 5 to 6 years old.
When the elements are joined by to or by, expressing a single element: a 10-to-15-year prison term; an 8-by-12-inch pan. But: The prison term is 10 to 15 years; the pan is 8 by 12 inches.

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You're correct on the comma with the who clause.

Below is our guidance on the other question. But I have to say, this particular sentence doesn't read well to me without the on. I'd use on in that one, despite what our style says. It's not wrong to use it. It's just different from our general style. Sometimes it's best to make an exception. And yes, it's hard to judge when those times are. Especially for a non-native speaker!

on 


Do not use on before a date or day of the week when its absence would not lead to confusion, except at the beginning of a sentence: The meeting will be held Monday. He will be inaugurated Jan. 20. On Sept. 3, the committee will meet to discuss the issue.
Use on to avoid an awkward juxtaposition of a date and a proper name: John met Mary on Monday. He told Biden on Thursday that the bill was doomed.

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We don't really cover architectural styles. But I agree with all that you surmise. Yes, ranch, bungalow and farmhouse are lowercase. Lowercase midcentury and midcentury modern. Lowercase terms such as modern or contemporary in any use.

You might argue that midcentury modern is a recognized architectural style. Maybe. But we are using lowercase as does Merriam-Webster, one of our secondary dictionaries. (Our primary dictionary, Webster's New World College Dictionary, doesn't list the term.)


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In our style, it's lowercase.

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... first and third Tuesday of each month.

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In this sense, make it she was naturalized, not she naturalized. But the government can naturalize her. Or, skip the word and just spell it out: She gained citizenship or she became a citizen ...

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Technically, our style is overtesting. I have to say, though, that it's hard to read as one word (to my eye). I'd use the hyphen. Either is correct; it's just a matter of which style you prefer. Don't make it two words, though.

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We'd use two words.

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We write out three and five in this use. How about: IT development projects are amortized over three to five years.

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If you're referring to a particular unit or team, or to the concept as a whole, use the singular. 

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We believe World Cup suffices in all stories. AP stories don't specify that it's the soccer World Cup. For example:

Shock and sadness engulfed the streets of Argentina’s capital as the long-awaited debut of the national team in the World Cup ended in a stunning 2-1 loss to Saudi Arabia. 

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We use quotation marks for book titles in any use, including social media posts The exceptions: No quote marks for the titles of  the Bible, the Quran and other holy books, and books that are primarily catalogs of reference material. In addition to catalogs, this category includes almanacs, directories, dictionaries, encyclopedias, gazetteers, handbooks and similar publications.

It's spelled out in more detail in the composition titles entry.

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Our style hasn't changed. Not every AP staffer knows every piece of style. Note, of course, that either version is correct. It's just a matter of style. We generally don't use a hyphen with the non- prefix. However, Webster's New World College Dictionary does hyphenate non-starter. 

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No extra period. The one does double duty.

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No quote marks needed.

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The retail store doesn't have low vision. So that's not a good construction. You wouldn't call it a blind retail store or a deaf retail store, right? Use more words to be clear on what you're talking about. 

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We'll look at expanding that. Don't have an answer right now.

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Use the first and last name on later references.

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We typically don't refer to specific phases. But if we did, we'd use numerals, not Roman numerals.

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I'd use the hyphen if you have to use the term. I also strongly suggest consulting urbandictionary.com to see its definition, then considering whether you want to use the term.

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Our semicolon entry says to use the semicolon, not a comma, in that use. And yes, and should follow the last semicolon.
How crisp is too crisp; what is overdone; what is just right; and what is not just right?

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