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Last Seven Days

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In countries that call their legislative body Parliament, it should be capitalized.

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No need for on in this instance, since its absence does not lead to confusion. See details in the on entry.

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When of course is used as an interjection, as it is in your example, it should be offset by commas.

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I would capitalize just Hispanic because it's a proper adjective, not because of any parallels with the phrase "historically Black colleges and universities."

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The use of an ellipsis could indicate to readers that material was excised from the quote, which is not the case, so I'd use a dash or just a period for the effect you're trying to achieve: Flying is awful now — we are the worst. Flying is awful now. We are the worst.

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The province is Balkh, and the preferred spelling is Mazar-e-Sharif. 

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Chances are, we wouldn't use a military title before a name in a headline. And if it is not before a name -- say, Panel questions top general on air strike -- we would not capitalize it.

Question from Bangalore, on Sept. 15, 2021

shelf-life settings/shelf life settings

Which is correct here?

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Most likely, we would hyphenate in this case for clarity.

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That would work -- no other punctuation would seem appropriate.

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If your publication's style is to capitalize all words in a header, it would be High-Risk Specialists. But AP would make it High-risk specialists.

Question from Appleton, Wisconsin, on Sept. 15, 2021

How would you handle Railroad Retirement Tax in terms of capitalization? 

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It appears that unlike the Railroad Retirement Tax Act, railroad retirement tax is not a proper name. So we would not capitalize it.

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Either is acceptable; in the interest of brevity, we might come down on the side of omitting of.

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Bail out is the correct phrase, as per Webster's New World College Dictionary. 

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Kids zone would be correct.

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According to AP guidance on the Roman Catholic Church, yes, the title Most Rev. is used correctly here.

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Joining modifiers with hyphens doesn't transform them into a new, single word, so you would capitalize all the words (save for prepositions of three or fewer letters and conjunctions of three or fewer letters): Unit-to-Unit Differential.

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AP stories have generally not described the regions as occupied territory unless in quotations.

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It would generally be nonfungible, according to guidance on non-.

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I'd go with "in," but either is fine.

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"Do it for you and your family" will do it. No reflexive needed here.

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If you want to use the term global financial crisis, I’d keep it lowercase and, if needed for clarity, pair it with a time frame: the global financial crisis of 2007-2009. That is a more specific way to refer to this particular financial crisis, several of which have occurred throughout history. But as more time passes and perspective is gained, don’t rule out further updates to this guidance.

Question from on Sept. 13, 2021

Is it science based or science-based?

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As per Webster's New World College Dictionary, it's hyphenated when preceding a noun.

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You are correct that "then" is not a conjunction. The grammatically pure approach would be "He cooked the crow and then ate it." But comprehension would not suffer if the sentence were "He cooked the crow, then ate it," in which "then" performs the duty of a conjunction.

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That might be useful if you're writing in specialized or technical publications, but it would not work for the more general readership of the AP.

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The AP Stylebook advises homebuyer as one word, so by extension, it would be homebuying process. However, there may be contexts in which home-buying or home buying would be clearer, such as a small-home buying process (in the spirit of the example; in real life, I'd recast it altogether).

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Kyiv

KEE'-yeev

Capital of Ukraine (new spelling and pronunciation)
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From the Topical Guides

2021 Back-to-School Topical Guide

The Associated Press has compiled a style guide of essential words, phrases and definitions related to the return to classes. Terms are from the AP Stylebook, usage in AP stories and Webster's New...


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