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Last Seven Days

Answer

A comma is optional in your first example. Using the comma provides more of a mental break, or a pause, between the two elements. It lets the reader take a mental breath. But it's not necessary. (I would use the comma there. I need to take a breath when thinking of exercise!) For the same reason, you could choose to use a comma in the second example. But I think it works better without it. (Sorry, there's really no rule on this one.)


Answer

Typically, there's no hyphen with auto- words. But I'd use it in this case; autofill may not be immediately clear to readers or users.


Answer

We use lowercase e in all e-constructions. So we'd make it e-statements.


Answer

AP style wouldn't use that acronym nor enclose it in parentheses. 

Here are relevant parts of the entry:

 abbreviations and acronyms 


A few universally recognized abbreviations are required in some circumstances. Some others are acceptable depending on the context. But in general, avoid alphabet soup. Do not use abbreviations or acronyms that the reader would not quickly recognize.
Abbreviations and most acronyms should be avoided in headlines.

AVOID AWKWARD CONSTRUCTIONS: Do not follow an organization's full name with an abbreviation or acronym in parentheses or set off by dashes. If an abbreviation or acronym would not be clear on second reference without this arrangement, do not use it.
Names not commonly before the public should not be reduced to acronyms solely to save a few words.

All that said, if you must use the acronym for your audience, put it in capital letters.


Answer

For some short quotes that blend into the rest of the sentence, you don't need a comma. I'd use the commas in this case, for reasons that I can't really put my finger on.


Answer

AP doesn't hyphenate those constructions.

Answer

There's not a formula; there are varying ways to do it. Just make sure it's 1) clear and 2) punctuated correctly. If your readers weren't already familiar with the dates, I might put the dates first. But presumably in this case, your readers know the dates involved in tournament week? Assuming that's the case, I'd put the times first. I'd do it this way:

During tournament week, dermatologists will provide free skin cancer screenings for fans from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 24 through Saturday, Jan. 26; and from 10 a.m.-noon Sunday, Jan. 27.

You also could use to instead of the hyphen for the time ranges.


Answer

In the text of stories, we always spell out state names. Under North Carolina law, anyone ... is correct.


Answer

We use British Open. The official name is The Open Championship. We have used British Open (to distinguish between the U.S. Open, for starters) for more than 100 years. The R&A started getting bullish about “The Open” in recent years. But our policy is more aligned with writing what readers understand. Thus, we use British Open.

 

Answer

It's 0.5 percentage point.


Answer

No quotes needed there. But that's pretty much the only context in which I'd use the term.

Answer

Come. Flip around the sentence in your mind: New opportunities come with the new year.

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I would break it up into two or three sentences. Take a step back and pretend that you're reading that sentence for the first time. Do you get lost midway through? And then maybe a second time? I did. As I recall from my university days, long sentences are indeed a staple of academic writing and in university settings. Break the mold! Write sentences that can be read and understood easily. Try something like this:

We share many goals: student success, research and creativity; access and diversity; partnerships; campus culture and service excellence; sense of place. Our dedication to those shared goals will be evident in our daily interactions on campus, as well as in initiatives and innovations we recommend to the university.


Answer

It's 2 in the morning for a spoken quote.


Answer

I'm not sure what you mean by a standalone line. If it's something like a header that you're setting off typographically, it's probably better to use no colon. But if it's a phrase in standard text, we still use the colon even if it's not a complete sentence. See the last part of the entry:


lists, bulleted lists 


AP uses dashes instead of bullets to introduce individual sections of a list; others may choose to use bullets. Put a space between the dash or bullet and the first word of each item in the list. Capitalize the first word following the dash or bullet. Use periods, not semicolons, at the end of each section, whether it is a full sentence or a phrase.
Use parallel construction for each item in a list:
— Start with the same part of speech for each item (in this example, a verb).
— Use the same voice (active or passive) for each item.
— Use the same verb tense for each item.
— Use the same sentence type (statement, question, exclamation) for each item.
— Use just a phrase for each item, if desired.
Introduce the list with a short phrase or sentence: Our partners: or These are our partners: or Our partners are:


Answer

Pre-digital.


Answer

We generally spell out Los Angeles Clippers if using the full name like that, but we allow for the Clippers on first reference and Los Angeles by itself as well. We also allow for LA once it’s clear what we’re talking about. 
 

Answer

I'm not sure what you're referring to with the part about "each entry."

AP style always uses a dateline. If we wrote 100 stories out of Boise, Idaho, we would use that dateline every time. But if it doesn't make sense to do so in your specific situation, then do what you think works better for your readers.


Answer

That's our style; you can choose not to follow it in this case. Also, our style is R's.

SINGLE LETTERS: Use 's: Mind your p's and q's. He learned the three R's and brought home a report card with four A's and two B's. The Oakland A's won the pennant.


Answer

Yes, if the phrase has to be used, it's blond beauty. Here's the entry:

blond, blonde  Use blond as a noun for males and as an adjective for all applications: She has blond hair. Use blonde as a noun for females. 


Answer

Yes, I'd use the hyphen for clarity. But better: Once you make reading labels a habit ...

Answer

It's not a construction that AP uses. I suggest consulting sources specific to the industry.


Answer

Looks like the previous entry was deleted. The term is redundant for in-person meetings. But if needed to distinguish from virtual meetings: They scheduled a face-to-face meeting, where they could meet face to face.


Question from RIchardson, Texas on Jan. 15, 2019

Is Arab-American hyphenated as a noun, just like African-American? 

Answer

As of this writing, yes.


Answer

Not for most of those. Here's the Middle East entry:


Middle East 


The term generally applies to southwest Asia west of Pakistan and Afghanistan (Iran, Iraq, Israel, Kuwait, Jordan, Lebanon, Oman, Bahrain, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, the eastern part of Turkey known also as Asia Minor, United Arab Emirates and Yemen), and northeastern Africa (Egypt and Sudan).
Some consider Libya and other Arabic-speaking countries of the Maghreb to be part of the region.
Popular usage once distinguished between the Near East (the westerly nations in the listing) and the Middle East (the easterly nations), but the two terms now overlap, with current practice favoring Middle East for both areas.
Use Middle East unless Near East is used by a source in a story.
Mideast is also acceptable, but Middle East is preferred.


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