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Question from Columbia, South Carolina, on March 08, 2021

Use of apostrophes with plural possessives: Deacons' Wives' Ministry?

Answer

Rather than lead the reader through a parade of possessives, we'd be tempted to go with the Deacons' Wives Ministry, in the same way that we don't add an apostrophe to the National Governors Association.

Answer

If you're suggesting "Savannah State University's Quality Enhancement Plan," probably not. It would seem to be a name in its entirety (albeit a very long one).

Answer

Alas, as you might expect, we rarely cover this kind of thing and so we haven't felt the need to set a style. Our advice: Pick a style and stick to it. We'd probably avoid capitalization for the most part, unless you're talking about words that demonstrably proper nouns. And unless you see the need to underscore the fact that a term is colloquial, you can steer clear of quotation marks.

Answer

You're right, generally. Webster's New World says an agency is an "administrative division of government with specific functions," which would seem to exclude departments that have many responsibilities, often exercised through their ... agencies. But an archive search will turn up numerous times in which "the agency" is used by AP reporters desperate to avoid using "the department" one more time in a story.

Answer

One word, to be consistent with website, webcast and webpage. But we'd probably just go with link.

Answer

We would avoid using either the title or the number, instead reporting that the president issued a directive for (whatever purpose). Or, in the first example, the advocates called upon the Biden administration to rescind a Trump directive that they claim conflates ...

Answer

We don't have guidance. But my personal guidance, as well as what I see elsewhere, is that to include is wrong in that use and including is right.

Answer

You nailed it. Generally it's best to give a specific source. But widely known figures such as the U.S. population are fine without attribution.

Answer

We generally use lowercase for those. You could choose to do differently.

Answer

CITY NAME, Netherlands 

Here's the entry:


Netherlands 


In datelines, give the name of the community followed by Netherlands:
MAASTRICHT, Netherlands (AP) –
In stories: the Netherlands or Netherlands as the construction of a sentence dictates.


Answer

We are using: Abdul Hamid Mohammed Dbeibah.

Answer

I'm not seeing any indication that ice melt without a specific brand name added to the phrase is a trademark.

Answer

Yes, I'd use a comma there.


Answer

Yes. And watch for an updated topical guide coming soon ...


Answer

No apostrophe, following the guidance in this section of the possessives entry:

DESCRIPTIVE PHRASES: Do not add an apostrophe to a word ending in s when it is used primarily in a descriptive sense: citizens band radio, a Cincinnati Reds infielder, a teachers college, a Teamsters request, a writers guide.
Memory aid: The apostrophe usually is not used if for or by rather than of would be appropriate in the longer form: a radio band for citizens, a college for teachers, a guide for writers, a request by the Teamsters.


Answer

Either long-haul COVID-19 or long COVID-19. We don't use the medical term.


Answer

The first. The second one isn't clear on what "it" is. This would also work:  A post to the restaurant’s Facebook page said the XXX location will close on [date] as it gets a full remodel.

Answer

We don't have guidance on that. I'd ask if you know the positions or former positions of everyone who has donated. Where would you draw the line of what positions to list and what not to list? How do you know if you know all that are relevant?

Answer

It's fine as you have it, since the two speakers are separated by other material. But don't stack successive quotes by different people. Even with closed quote marks after Person A's quote, a reader until getting to the Person B attribution could get the impression that Person A was still speaking.

Don't do this:

“I’m really proud of the team and proud that the team came out on top,” said John Doe, Made Up organization president. “I thought their idea was very well-crafted, and they worked long and hard on it.”
“This will help the member when complex problems arise throughout different organizations,” said Changing the Name team member Joe Smith, a Made Up plans officer. “Those leaders at those levels will be able to establish their own dynamic teams for a particular issue or anomaly they are having to get a quicker response. This will put all the players together much quicker than sending out hundreds of emails to try to figure who is available in a specific time zone.” 


Answer

We don't address such questions. I would think it's fairly variable, depending on the type of editing being done, the complexity of the subject matter, etc.

Question from SCOTTSDALE, Arizona, on March 03, 2021

Is it NAICS or Naics for the industrial classifications abbreviation?

Answer

That's not one we use. Neither Webster's New World College Dictionary nor Merriam-Webster lists it. I've seen it both ways. I'd say it's your choice.

Answer

I think we will need to agree to disagree on this one. I don't have a problem with using a comma in those cases. I think it's a stylistic choice. Either can be correct. 

I'd argue that often a person (if that person is me, for example) does pause after the first word when saying those sentences out loud. Adding the comma (or the pause) does provide for a bit more emphasis. I think that's appropriate and effective in many cases. So, there you have it. But I know you don't agree.

Answer

I'd use the hyphens. See this part of the hyphen entry:

Generally, also use a hyphen in modifiers of three or more words: a know-it-all attitude, black-and-white photography, a sink-or-swim moment, a win-at-all-costs approach. Consider carefully, though, before deciding to use more than three modifiers.


Answer

The first option you note.

Answer

We don't have an entry on either Bengaluru or Bangalore. I did delete one outdated Ask the Editor response.

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